Grays the Mountain Sends by Bryan Schutmaat / Silas Finch 

As the photobook season begins to overheat itself into a tangled frenzy, this is a forthcoming title well worth keeping an eye on, if not ordering outright. Bryan’s work in Grays The Mountain Sends is tremendously tender and unwaveringly frank, and it is very good thing that these photographs will finally make their way in print out into the world. Photography has a unique relationship to time, and this work does a masterful job at drawing forth inter-generational cycles of history, and relating them to a troubled present moment in ways that open us up to our need for narrative to make sense of ourselves, and the world we inhabit together.

Introducing the work in an essay, I wrote and continue to believe that the “photographs are fashioned from a sensitivity for the brittleness of hope and the inextinguishable will to dream, despite the deadweight of sadness that remains in a land so full of promise, and so riven by a studious neglect.” See more of the book here.

@11 months ago with 14 notes
#Photography #Bryan Schutmaat #Documentary photography #Landscape #Portraiture #Landscape photography #Silas Finch Foundation #Photobooks #Richard Hugo #William Kittredge 

"

The principal supporting business now
is rage. Hatred of the various grays
the mountain sends, hatred of the mill,
The Silver Bill repeal, the best liked girls
who leave each year for Butte. One good
restaurant and bars can’t wipe the boredom out.
The 1907 boom, eight going silver mines,
a dance floor built on springs—
all memory resolves itself in gaze,
in panoramic green you know the cattle eat
or two stacks high above the town,
two dead kilns, the huge mill in collapse
for fifty years that won’t fall finally down.

Isn’t this your life? That ancient kiss
still burning out your eyes? Isn’t this defeat
so accurate the church bell simply seems
a pure announcement: ring and no one comes?
Don’t empty houses ring? Are magnesium
and scorn sufficient to support a town,
not just Philipsburg, but towns
of towering blondes, good jazz and booze
the world will never let you have
until the town you came from dies inside?

"

@3 years ago with 2 notes
#Poetry #Richard Hugo #Bryan Schutmaat 

Richard Hugo on poetry

"In the news article the relation of the words to the subject (triggering subject since there is no other unless you can provide it) is a strong one. The relation of the words to the writer is so weak that for our purposes it isn’t worth consideration. Since the majority of your reading has been newspapers, you are used to seeing language function this way. When you write a poem these relations must reverse themselves. That is, the relation of the words to the subject must weaken and the relation of the words to the writer (you) must take on strength.

This is probably the hardest thing about writing poems. It may be a problem with every poem, at least for a long time. Somehow you must switch your allegiance from the triggering subject to the words. For our purposes I’ll use towns as examples. The poem is always in your hometown, but you have a better chance of finding it in another. The reason for that, I believe, is that the stable set of knowns that the poem needs to anchor on is less stable at home than in the town you’ve just seen for the first time. At home, not only do you know that the movie house wasn’t always there, or that the grocer is a newcomer who took over after the former grocer committed suicide, you have complicated emotional responses that defy sorting out. With the strange town you can assume all knowns are stable, and you owe the details nothing emotionally. However, not just any town will do. Though you’ve never seen it before, it must be a town you’ve lived in all your life. You must take emotional possession of the town and so the town must be one that, for personal reasons I can’t understand, you feel is your town.”

— Richard Hugo “The Triggering Town” in The Triggering Town

(Source: books.wwnorton.com)

@2 years ago with 8 notes
#Poetry #Richard Hugo 
Bryan Schutmaat. “Grays The Mountain Sends”. Houston Center for Photography, May 6th - June 19th 2011. Inspired by the poetry of Richard Hugo.

Bryan Schutmaat. “Grays The Mountain Sends”. Houston Center for Photography, May 6th - June 19th 2011. Inspired by the poetry of Richard Hugo.

@3 years ago
#Photography #Bryan Scutmaat #Richard Hugo #Poetry 
Grays the Mountain Sends by Bryan Schutmaat / Silas Finch→

As the photobook season begins to overheat itself into a tangled frenzy, this is a forthcoming title well worth keeping an eye on, if not ordering outright. Bryan’s work in Grays The Mountain Sends is tremendously tender and unwaveringly frank, and it is very good thing that these photographs will finally make their way in print out into the world. Photography has a unique relationship to time, and this work does a masterful job at drawing forth inter-generational cycles of history, and relating them to a troubled present moment in ways that open us up to our need for narrative to make sense of ourselves, and the world we inhabit together.

Introducing the work in an essay, I wrote and continue to believe that the “photographs are fashioned from a sensitivity for the brittleness of hope and the inextinguishable will to dream, despite the deadweight of sadness that remains in a land so full of promise, and so riven by a studious neglect.” See more of the book here.

11 months ago
#Photography #Bryan Schutmaat #Documentary photography #Landscape #Portraiture #Landscape photography #Silas Finch Foundation #Photobooks #Richard Hugo #William Kittredge 
Richard Hugo on poetry

"In the news article the relation of the words to the subject (triggering subject since there is no other unless you can provide it) is a strong one. The relation of the words to the writer is so weak that for our purposes it isn’t worth consideration. Since the majority of your reading has been newspapers, you are used to seeing language function this way. When you write a poem these relations must reverse themselves. That is, the relation of the words to the subject must weaken and the relation of the words to the writer (you) must take on strength.

This is probably the hardest thing about writing poems. It may be a problem with every poem, at least for a long time. Somehow you must switch your allegiance from the triggering subject to the words. For our purposes I’ll use towns as examples. The poem is always in your hometown, but you have a better chance of finding it in another. The reason for that, I believe, is that the stable set of knowns that the poem needs to anchor on is less stable at home than in the town you’ve just seen for the first time. At home, not only do you know that the movie house wasn’t always there, or that the grocer is a newcomer who took over after the former grocer committed suicide, you have complicated emotional responses that defy sorting out. With the strange town you can assume all knowns are stable, and you owe the details nothing emotionally. However, not just any town will do. Though you’ve never seen it before, it must be a town you’ve lived in all your life. You must take emotional possession of the town and so the town must be one that, for personal reasons I can’t understand, you feel is your town.”

— Richard Hugo “The Triggering Town” in The Triggering Town

(Source: books.wwnorton.com)

2 years ago
#Poetry #Richard Hugo 
"

The principal supporting business now
is rage. Hatred of the various grays
the mountain sends, hatred of the mill,
The Silver Bill repeal, the best liked girls
who leave each year for Butte. One good
restaurant and bars can’t wipe the boredom out.
The 1907 boom, eight going silver mines,
a dance floor built on springs—
all memory resolves itself in gaze,
in panoramic green you know the cattle eat
or two stacks high above the town,
two dead kilns, the huge mill in collapse
for fifty years that won’t fall finally down.

Isn’t this your life? That ancient kiss
still burning out your eyes? Isn’t this defeat
so accurate the church bell simply seems
a pure announcement: ring and no one comes?
Don’t empty houses ring? Are magnesium
and scorn sufficient to support a town,
not just Philipsburg, but towns
of towering blondes, good jazz and booze
the world will never let you have
until the town you came from dies inside?

"
3 years ago
#Poetry #Richard Hugo #Bryan Schutmaat 
Bryan Schutmaat. “Grays The Mountain Sends”. Houston Center for Photography, May 6th - June 19th 2011. Inspired by the poetry of Richard Hugo.
3 years ago
#Photography #Bryan Scutmaat #Richard Hugo #Poetry