Edward Hopper, “Approaching the City” (1946), and “Sunday” (1926), of whom Geoff Dyer said:

"[Hopper] could claim to be the most influential American photographer of the twentieth century—even though he didn’t take any photographs."

@4 months ago with 79 notes
#Art #Painting #Edward Hopper #Photography #Geoff Dyer #Light 

"There is something extraordinarily poignant about this apparently haphazard collection of grabbed snaps from everywhere and nowhere in particular. It is as if the technological relay that brings the work into existence gives vent to a nostalgia and homesickness so intense that the longed-for original becomes impossibly intimate, mind-bogglingly remote and – as a consequence – unfathomably strange."

From: Geoff Dyer - “How Google Street View is inspiring new photography" in The Guardian (UK)
@2 years ago with 4 notes
#Photography #Criticism #Geoff Dyer #Michael Wolf #Doug Rickard #Jon Rafman #Google Street View #Documentary photography #Art 

Geoff Dyer on Diane Arbus 

The irrepressible, utterly incorrigible yet nevertheless brilliant Geoff Dyer here gives a lecture at the Nottingham Contemporary museum (August, 2010) on Diane Arbus, entitled “Explaining a Trick by way of a Further Trick”. 

You can download the video of the lecture from iTunes by following this link to podcast number 63. It’s a tremendously affectionate and insightful reading of Arbus’s work and working methods.

@2 years ago with 7 notes
#Photography #Lecture #Criticism #Geoff Dyer #Nottingham Contemporary #Diane Arbus 
Ed Clark “Going Home”, depicting navy shipman Graham Jackson following the funeral train on the occasion of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s burial.
"What we have, in other words, is a vivid example of the camera’s unique capability: not the creation of a myth but its depiction" — Geoff Dyer “The Ongoing Moment”.

Ed ClarkGoing Home”, depicting navy shipman Graham Jackson following the funeral train on the occasion of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s burial.

"What we have, in other words, is a vivid example of the camera’s unique capability: not the creation of a myth but its depiction" — Geoff DyerThe Ongoing Moment”.

@3 years ago with 2 notes
#Photography #Ed Clark #LIFE magazine #Geoff Dyer #Theory 

Part one of a three part panel discussion on the critical work of John Berger, centred on the forthcoming publication by Aperture of a collection his essays on photography, titled Understanding a Photograph.

@9 months ago with 41 notes
#Photography #Panel Discussion #John Berger #Geoff Dyer #Aperture #Wendy Lesser #Lawrence Weschler #Christophe Agou 

Jamie Andrews, Head of Modern Literary Manuscripts at the British Library, here gives an interview with Geoff Dyer about John Berger and his work. Excellent and in a very definite way inspirational listening.

@2 years ago with 6 note and 10 play
#Art #Literature #Criticism #Photography #Jamie Andrews #The British Library #Geoff Dyer #John Berger 

"Suppose that you meet someone who is a compulsive name- dropper. At first it’s irritating, then it’s boring. Once you have identified it as a defining characteristic, however, you long for the individual concerned to manifest this trait at every opportunity — whereupon it becomes a source of hilarity and delight. And so, having experienced a crescendo of frustration, I now look forward to a new book in which Fried advances his habit of recessive deferral to the extent that he doesn’t get round to what he wants to say until after the book is finished, until it’s time to start the next one (which will be spent entirely on looking back on what was said in the previous volume). At that point he will cross the border from criticism to the creation of a real work of art (fiction if you will) called “Kiss Marks on the Mirror: Why Michael Fried Matters as a Writer Even More Than He Did Before."

@3 years ago with 5 notes
#Writing #Geoff Dyer #Photography #Michael Fried #The New York Times 
A characteristically witty shot by the talented Jennilee Marigomen, from her journal. Like a Geoff Dyer reworking of Strand’s White Picket Fence. See more of the catholic tastes of her elliptical eye here.

A characteristically witty shot by the talented Jennilee Marigomen, from her journal. Like a Geoff Dyer reworking of Strand’s White Picket Fence. See more of the catholic tastes of her elliptical eye here.

@3 years ago with 30 notes
#Photography #Jennilee Marigomen #Flickr #Geoff Dyer 
4 months ago
#Art #Painting #Edward Hopper #Photography #Geoff Dyer #Light 
9 months ago
#Photography #Panel Discussion #John Berger #Geoff Dyer #Aperture #Wendy Lesser #Lawrence Weschler #Christophe Agou 
"There is something extraordinarily poignant about this apparently haphazard collection of grabbed snaps from everywhere and nowhere in particular. It is as if the technological relay that brings the work into existence gives vent to a nostalgia and homesickness so intense that the longed-for original becomes impossibly intimate, mind-bogglingly remote and – as a consequence – unfathomably strange."
From: Geoff Dyer - “How Google Street View is inspiring new photography" in The Guardian (UK)
2 years ago
#Photography #Criticism #Geoff Dyer #Michael Wolf #Doug Rickard #Jon Rafman #Google Street View #Documentary photography #Art 

Jamie Andrews, Head of Modern Literary Manuscripts at the British Library, here gives an interview with Geoff Dyer about John Berger and his work. Excellent and in a very definite way inspirational listening.

2 years ago
#Art #Literature #Criticism #Photography #Jamie Andrews #The British Library #Geoff Dyer #John Berger 
Geoff Dyer on Diane Arbus→

The irrepressible, utterly incorrigible yet nevertheless brilliant Geoff Dyer here gives a lecture at the Nottingham Contemporary museum (August, 2010) on Diane Arbus, entitled “Explaining a Trick by way of a Further Trick”. 

You can download the video of the lecture from iTunes by following this link to podcast number 63. It’s a tremendously affectionate and insightful reading of Arbus’s work and working methods.

2 years ago
#Photography #Lecture #Criticism #Geoff Dyer #Nottingham Contemporary #Diane Arbus 
"Suppose that you meet someone who is a compulsive name- dropper. At first it’s irritating, then it’s boring. Once you have identified it as a defining characteristic, however, you long for the individual concerned to manifest this trait at every opportunity — whereupon it becomes a source of hilarity and delight. And so, having experienced a crescendo of frustration, I now look forward to a new book in which Fried advances his habit of recessive deferral to the extent that he doesn’t get round to what he wants to say until after the book is finished, until it’s time to start the next one (which will be spent entirely on looking back on what was said in the previous volume). At that point he will cross the border from criticism to the creation of a real work of art (fiction if you will) called “Kiss Marks on the Mirror: Why Michael Fried Matters as a Writer Even More Than He Did Before."
3 years ago
#Writing #Geoff Dyer #Photography #Michael Fried #The New York Times 
Ed Clark “Going Home”, depicting navy shipman Graham Jackson following the funeral train on the occasion of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s burial.
"What we have, in other words, is a vivid example of the camera’s unique capability: not the creation of a myth but its depiction" — Geoff Dyer “The Ongoing Moment”.
3 years ago
#Photography #Ed Clark #LIFE magazine #Geoff Dyer #Theory 
A characteristically witty shot by the talented Jennilee Marigomen, from her journal. Like a Geoff Dyer reworking of Strand’s White Picket Fence. See more of the catholic tastes of her elliptical eye here.
3 years ago
#Photography #Jennilee Marigomen #Flickr #Geoff Dyer