“Every photographed object is merely the trace left behind by the disappearance of all the rest. It is an almost perfect crime, an almost total resolution of the world, which merely leaves the illusion of a particular object shining forth, the image of which becomes an impenetrable enigma.” — Jean Baudrillard.

Photographs from Window Seat by Jennilee Marigomen.

@12 hours ago with 63 notes
#Art #Photography #Jennilee Marigomen #Theory #Jean Baudrillard 

However elegantly or gleefully his books distort story-telling conventions, they nevertheless exhibit great affection for the transfigurative power of narrative on our common means of perception. They transform banality into rich and amusing anachronism, and recall to us in oblique but insightful ways how much our sense of self or place was always some kind of invention.

The title comes from Stewart Edward White’s book Rose Dawn (quoted in City of Quartz), in which the author expresses amazement that anything green could live in Los Angeles. After I moved to L.A. I experienced something like 40 straight days of cloudless blue skies, and decided that I was secretly part of some reality show, and that the sun and earth had reached an agreement in order to produce the optimum filming environment. This unnatural feeling, as well as a slight sense of déjà vu, compelled me to photograph the locations. Walking through the city I could let my memories and fantasies of films overlap with the real places. It became a bit like a gumball being rolled through the street picking up more and more gum. I shot everything at midday, so that throughout the book there’s no sense of time passing. 

— The Sun Shone Glaringly: a conversation with Seth Lower, just published at thegreatleapsideways.com

@2 days ago with 39 notes
#Art #Photography #Seth Lower #Cinema #History #Narrative #Identity #The Ice Plant #The Great Leap Sideways 
@4 days ago with 182 notes
#Art #Photography #Tamas Dezso #Landscape #Portraiture 

"The landscapes in Crossing open up linkages to Ruwedel’s Dusk series, and to his photographs of tree houses and abandoned settlements. Gradually, the patterning of these distinct but bonded series forms a kind of autobiography of objects an autobiography in which we sense the poetic rendering not merely of differing systems of time, but of collective vulnerabilities set against the complexity of the western desert. It is an arid meniscus, a final perimeter bridging the desperation of flight and the stability of freedom — the desert as the seedbed of multiple utopias, and the indomitable surface of tectonic cycles beneath which the slow-moving gears of geological time churn with dogged and irrepressible indifference.”

— from “An Autobiography of Objects: a brief thought on the work of Mark Ruwedel

@6 days ago with 60 notes
#Art #Photography #Mark Ruwedel #Landscape photography #The New Topographics #The Great Leap Sideways #History #Culture #Inspiration 

Gilpin on the Photographic Image

From the tumblr of David Simonton:

"I think it’s a question of trying to produce a superb design in photography, and making a print that is adequate to that aim. There is no creative thing, whether it be writing, art, painting, architecture, or music that does not have structure and design. It just doesn’t stand up without it.”

Laura Gilpin

@1 day ago with 21 notes
#Art #Photography #Laura Gilpin #David Simonton #The Being Time 

In Anansi or Ivy, supine black bodies fuse together into sculptural oddities that are borne out of a soluble relation to the earth. And yet a certain ironic dissonance is produced by the whiteness of a shirt in shadow, or the presence of England’s Three Lions on a pair of shorts. The antinomies of blackness and whiteness, of the earthly and the intellectual, the savage and the saviour, are here overt structuring elements of the image. But such tensions as these contrasts evoke do not trouble a long history of ethnic degradation – they reinforce it as a further instance of the theatrical acquiescence we have come to expect from subservient, primitive blacks. (…)

Sassen claims to “focus on the process of addressing the viewer,” arguing that her portraits are “about the gaze of the viewer and about my own perspective” as opposed to “some truth about the photographed subject.”

We are thus invited to consider the extent to which these images, in their repetitive subjugation of nubile black bodies, might expand our sense of ourselves or of the photographer’s perspective – that is, we are invited to consider ‘Africa’ as an expression of the West. On this logic, Africa’s representational function is purely to mirror the pressing nature of largely western preoccupations. And so the bodies in these images exist purely to serve.”

— The Stilled Life of the Pikinini: Viviane Sassen’s Pikin Slee, just published at thegreatleapsideways.com

@3 days ago with 467 notes
#Art #Photography #Viviane Sassen #Portraiture #Orientalism #Fetish #The Great Leap Sideways #Criticism 

"Wandering - unsettledness, rootlessness, estrangement - is a classical American characteristic: much of the country, at least in the West, is still on the raft with Huck and Jim. Certainly major areas of American culture celebrate mobility, the poetics of the open road. A literary genre from Twain to Whitman to Kerouac to innumerable contemporary writers, it is perhaps the central theme of country music with all its rolling stones and lost highways, its strain whistles and truck-driving epics; and it cuts a wide swath through American film, whose favorite subjects have always been tramps, outlaws, and cowboys (and whose recent swarm of road movies have at last included women as coequal wanderers rather than as milestones in a male journey). It is a psychic condition in which landscape and the freedom to move through it compensate for loneliness and disassociation, the internal exile of the outsider. It is a connoisseurship of the bittersweet taste of melancholy, of the blue of distance, of landscapes with a road running through their center, the horizon as a promise rather than a boundary. Wandering was supposed to be a finite part of American experience: you left the old world and came to the new world, a literal transplant complete with roots, but a huge portion of the population kept moving."

@5 days ago with 45 notes
#Art #Landscape #Culture #Rebecca Solnit #Richard Misrach #History #The Desert 
“Nephi, Utah, 7-14-14," by Steven Smith - follow his tumblr here. This one gets better and better the closer you look.

Nephi, Utah, 7-14-14," by Steven Smith - follow his tumblr here. This one gets better and better the closer you look.

@1 week ago with 119 notes
#Art #Photograhy #Steven Smith #Street photography 
12 hours ago
#Art #Photography #Jennilee Marigomen #Theory #Jean Baudrillard 
Gilpin on the Photographic Image

From the tumblr of David Simonton:

"I think it’s a question of trying to produce a superb design in photography, and making a print that is adequate to that aim. There is no creative thing, whether it be writing, art, painting, architecture, or music that does not have structure and design. It just doesn’t stand up without it.”

Laura Gilpin

1 day ago
#Art #Photography #Laura Gilpin #David Simonton #The Being Time 
2 days ago
#Art #Photography #Seth Lower #Cinema #History #Narrative #Identity #The Ice Plant #The Great Leap Sideways 
3 days ago
#Art #Photography #Viviane Sassen #Portraiture #Orientalism #Fetish #The Great Leap Sideways #Criticism 
4 days ago
#Art #Photography #Tamas Dezso #Landscape #Portraiture 
"Wandering - unsettledness, rootlessness, estrangement - is a classical American characteristic: much of the country, at least in the West, is still on the raft with Huck and Jim. Certainly major areas of American culture celebrate mobility, the poetics of the open road. A literary genre from Twain to Whitman to Kerouac to innumerable contemporary writers, it is perhaps the central theme of country music with all its rolling stones and lost highways, its strain whistles and truck-driving epics; and it cuts a wide swath through American film, whose favorite subjects have always been tramps, outlaws, and cowboys (and whose recent swarm of road movies have at last included women as coequal wanderers rather than as milestones in a male journey). It is a psychic condition in which landscape and the freedom to move through it compensate for loneliness and disassociation, the internal exile of the outsider. It is a connoisseurship of the bittersweet taste of melancholy, of the blue of distance, of landscapes with a road running through their center, the horizon as a promise rather than a boundary. Wandering was supposed to be a finite part of American experience: you left the old world and came to the new world, a literal transplant complete with roots, but a huge portion of the population kept moving."
5 days ago
#Art #Landscape #Culture #Rebecca Solnit #Richard Misrach #History #The Desert 
6 days ago
#Art #Photography #Mark Ruwedel #Landscape photography #The New Topographics #The Great Leap Sideways #History #Culture #Inspiration 
“Nephi, Utah, 7-14-14," by Steven Smith - follow his tumblr here. This one gets better and better the closer you look.
1 week ago
#Art #Photograhy #Steven Smith #Street photography