Masahisa Fukase The Solitude of Ravens (1991), via Le BAL Books.

@2 days ago with 68 notes
#Art #Photography #Masahisa Fukase #Le BAL 

An excellent lecture by David Campany on the distinct significance to photography of the printed page and the wall, and on the remarkable and often iconoclastic magazine work of Walker Evans, from March 2014. Organized by the Emily Carr University and Presentation House Gallery, Vancouver, Canada.

@1 week ago with 31 notes
#Art #Photography #Magazines #Publishing #David Campany #Walker Evans #Jeff Wall #Dan Graham #Ed Ruscha #Modernism #Mass Culture #Journalism 

A short video on the exhibition Jeff Wall - Tableaux Pictures Photographs 1996 - 2013, which ran 1st March - 3rd August 2014 at the Stedelijk Museum.

@2 weeks ago with 28 notes
#Art #Photography #Jeff Wall 

"Looking at art, we learn about ourselves. Comparing views on art, we learn about one another. Disputing it, we shape culture. Where there is no argument there can be no consequentially meaningful art. Today, what passes for debate has occluded the intellectual, emotional, and spiritual stakes of aesthetic experience, which assumes the odor of a minor private vice. How we cope with the implications will affect what, as parties to history, we become."

@2 weeks ago with 63 notes
#Art #Public Space #Criticism #Peter Schjeldahl #The New Yorker 

"She turns her back on you; this, it would seem, is her appeal. She’s been painted like this for centuries, and, more recently, photographed. Often she is naked, in a bathroom or bedroom, solitary, sleeping or day-dreaming, or at a picnic, momentarily stilled, enveloped in a vague, dark space. The one constant is that her face is obscured. Her identity is fluid, nuanced; it can be elegiac, erotic or sullen, an homage to something lost or never quite gained, a study in both negation and yearning. It’s impossible to know whether she – who appears in so many guises – was ever, in the act of being represented, aware that someone was looking at her (the observed is often innocent of the observer). Whether we read the artist’s rejection of her face as a reflection of her inner life, or read the focus on her body as an indication of sensual preoccupations, she is ultimately irreducible and as such can be whoever we want to her to be."

Jennifer HiggieAlone Again, Or" - Frieze magazine, Issue 124 (Jun/Aug 2009).

Images (in order) by Joanna Piotrowska, Jo Ann Callis, Gerhard Richter, Richard Learoyd, Viviane Sassen and Eva Vermandel

@3 days ago with 124 notes
#Art #Photography #Painting #Criticism #Jennifer Higgie #Frieze magazine #Joanna Piotrowska #Jo Ann Callis #Gerhard Richter #Richard Learoyd #Viviane Sassen 

Two views on Winogrand

image

"Winogrand gets one aspect of the sixties better than any other photographer: the visible divide of contempt of one half of America for another half. Nowadays, visual evidence of one’s political persuasion is blurred, almost gone. Fox News guests sport goatees, and the hosts talk to Ted Nugent. In Winogrand’s world you don’t need a weatherman to know which way the political wind blows. Construction workers bellow at long-haired protesters; everyone peers with hatred at youth. A telling picture from 1969 pictures what looks like a family of out-of-towners dumbstruck at the hippies in Central Park. The world opens in the divide between them—a divide that turns cosmic in the ’70s pictures. Everyone turns into his or her own fun-loving or cloistered cathedral. (…)

Many also claim that these late pictures show a falling-off. I disagree. They, too, follow America in these years: the way places went from being concentrated to being bland, full of burnouts and lost souls riding on packed airplanes. These late pictures complete Winogrand’s atlas of America, his cosmology of the inner life of a country turning inside out, twisting into half-beast, turning back, creating nests of new beings.
Something we’ve been missing also becomes evident here. The whole world is now filled with incredible images—especially on Instagram and other social networks—that owe something to Winogrand’s, documenting life, change, and all the rest. Yet the art world and museums are not.”

— Jerry SaltzPhotographer Garry Winogrand Captured America As It Split Wide Open" in Vulture, (August 2014)

image

"The real problem here is that Winogrand’s praxis — along with the theory that has sprung up around it, drafted by such photographer-critics as Ben Lifson, Leo Rubinfien, Tod Papageorge, and of course Szarkowski himself — is premised on what photographer-theorist Richard Kirstel, in an essay, has called “reverence for the intensity of the glimpse.” And, in the last analysis, the glimpse is simply an insufficient basis for the construction of an epic vision. It will do for lyric poetry — for a Kertész, a Doisneau, a Levitt — but not for those who think on epic scale: Edward Weston, Eugene Smith. Only Robert Frank ever built an epic on glimpses — and he managed that not by glimpsing better than other photographers, but by developing and maintaining a political stance (which Winogrand studiously avoided) and by painstakingly redacting his imagery into a spare, taut, book-length sequence.

Epic scale demands, among other things, the capacity for prolonged attention that Winogrand so clearly lacked. After all, how seriously are we to take the droppings of a gluttonous voyeur who spent the last seven years of his life producing a third of a million negatives without bothering to look at any of them, much less analyze them critically? This was not a photographer; this was a shooter, afflicted with a textbook case of terminal distraction, the quintessence if not the prototype of the dreaded “Hand With Five Fingers” you have surely seen in camera ads on TV.

It’s my guess that, at some time in the future, Winogrand’s main usefulness to the medium will be seen to have been his willingness to go down this dead-end path and explore it to the bitter end — so that no one needs to pass that way again.”

— A.D. ColemanMonkeyCam Redux at the Met" from Nearby Café (originally published in Photo Communiqué (June 1988))

image

@2 weeks ago with 56 notes
#Art #Photography #Garry Winogrand #Criticism #Jerry Saltz #A.D. Coleman 

Tree Houses, from the exhibition Neighbors, Records, etc., by Mark Ruwedel, which ran at Gallery Luisotti from May 18th to July 6th, 2013.

Keep an eye our for Ruwedel’s forthcoming book Message From The Exterior, due out from Steidl this autumn.

@2 weeks ago with 219 notes
#Art #Photography #Mark Ruwedel #Gallery Luisotti #Steidl 
@2 weeks ago with 131 notes
#Photography #Art #Guido Guidi #Landscape 
2 days ago
#Art #Photography #Masahisa Fukase #Le BAL 
3 days ago
#Art #Photography #Painting #Criticism #Jennifer Higgie #Frieze magazine #Joanna Piotrowska #Jo Ann Callis #Gerhard Richter #Richard Learoyd #Viviane Sassen 
1 week ago
#Art #Photography #Magazines #Publishing #David Campany #Walker Evans #Jeff Wall #Dan Graham #Ed Ruscha #Modernism #Mass Culture #Journalism 
Two views on Winogrand

image

"Winogrand gets one aspect of the sixties better than any other photographer: the visible divide of contempt of one half of America for another half. Nowadays, visual evidence of one’s political persuasion is blurred, almost gone. Fox News guests sport goatees, and the hosts talk to Ted Nugent. In Winogrand’s world you don’t need a weatherman to know which way the political wind blows. Construction workers bellow at long-haired protesters; everyone peers with hatred at youth. A telling picture from 1969 pictures what looks like a family of out-of-towners dumbstruck at the hippies in Central Park. The world opens in the divide between them—a divide that turns cosmic in the ’70s pictures. Everyone turns into his or her own fun-loving or cloistered cathedral. (…)

Many also claim that these late pictures show a falling-off. I disagree. They, too, follow America in these years: the way places went from being concentrated to being bland, full of burnouts and lost souls riding on packed airplanes. These late pictures complete Winogrand’s atlas of America, his cosmology of the inner life of a country turning inside out, twisting into half-beast, turning back, creating nests of new beings.
Something we’ve been missing also becomes evident here. The whole world is now filled with incredible images—especially on Instagram and other social networks—that owe something to Winogrand’s, documenting life, change, and all the rest. Yet the art world and museums are not.”

— Jerry SaltzPhotographer Garry Winogrand Captured America As It Split Wide Open" in Vulture, (August 2014)

image

"The real problem here is that Winogrand’s praxis — along with the theory that has sprung up around it, drafted by such photographer-critics as Ben Lifson, Leo Rubinfien, Tod Papageorge, and of course Szarkowski himself — is premised on what photographer-theorist Richard Kirstel, in an essay, has called “reverence for the intensity of the glimpse.” And, in the last analysis, the glimpse is simply an insufficient basis for the construction of an epic vision. It will do for lyric poetry — for a Kertész, a Doisneau, a Levitt — but not for those who think on epic scale: Edward Weston, Eugene Smith. Only Robert Frank ever built an epic on glimpses — and he managed that not by glimpsing better than other photographers, but by developing and maintaining a political stance (which Winogrand studiously avoided) and by painstakingly redacting his imagery into a spare, taut, book-length sequence.

Epic scale demands, among other things, the capacity for prolonged attention that Winogrand so clearly lacked. After all, how seriously are we to take the droppings of a gluttonous voyeur who spent the last seven years of his life producing a third of a million negatives without bothering to look at any of them, much less analyze them critically? This was not a photographer; this was a shooter, afflicted with a textbook case of terminal distraction, the quintessence if not the prototype of the dreaded “Hand With Five Fingers” you have surely seen in camera ads on TV.

It’s my guess that, at some time in the future, Winogrand’s main usefulness to the medium will be seen to have been his willingness to go down this dead-end path and explore it to the bitter end — so that no one needs to pass that way again.”

— A.D. ColemanMonkeyCam Redux at the Met" from Nearby Café (originally published in Photo Communiqué (June 1988))

image

2 weeks ago
#Art #Photography #Garry Winogrand #Criticism #Jerry Saltz #A.D. Coleman 
2 weeks ago
#Art #Photography #Jeff Wall 
2 weeks ago
#Art #Photography #Mark Ruwedel #Gallery Luisotti #Steidl 
"Looking at art, we learn about ourselves. Comparing views on art, we learn about one another. Disputing it, we shape culture. Where there is no argument there can be no consequentially meaningful art. Today, what passes for debate has occluded the intellectual, emotional, and spiritual stakes of aesthetic experience, which assumes the odor of a minor private vice. How we cope with the implications will affect what, as parties to history, we become."
2 weeks ago
#Art #Public Space #Criticism #Peter Schjeldahl #The New Yorker 
2 weeks ago
#Photography #Art #Guido Guidi #Landscape